Tuesday, 1 January 2019

Locked Up: ‘Patients’ and their Gaolers. 15. Claude Eatherly. Hiroshima Pilot. Anthony Stadlen conducts Inner Circle Seminar 262 (9 August 2020)


Locked Up: ‘Patients’ and their Gaolers
15. Claude Eatherly
Hiroshima Pilot (6 August 1945)

75 years after Nagasaki (9 August 1945)

Anthony Stadlen
conducts
Inner Circle Seminar No. 262
Sunday 9 August 2020
10 a.m. to 5 p.m.


Venue: Durrants Hotel, 26–32 George Street, Marylebone, London W1H 5BJ
Cost: Psychotherapy trainees £132, others £165, some bursaries; coffee, tea, Durrants rock, mineral water included; payable in advance; no refunds or transfers unless seminar cancelled
Apply to: Anthony Stadlen, ‘Oakleigh’, 2A Alexandra Avenue, London N22 7XE
Tel: +44 (0) 20 8888 6857  iPhone: +44 (0) 07809 433 250
E-mail: stadlen@aol.com  or: stadlenanthony@gmail.com
For further information on seminars, visit: http://anthonystadlen.blogspot.com/

The Inner Circle Seminars were founded by Anthony Stadlen in 1996 as an ethical, existential, phenomenological search for truth in psychotherapy. They have been kindly described by Thomas Szasz as ‘Institute for Advanced Studies in the Moral Foundations of Human Decency and Helpfulness’. But they are independent of all institutes, schools and universities.

Fort!–Da! A century of speculations on Freud’s grandson’s game. Daniel Benveniste conducts Inner Circle Seminar 462 (14 June 2020)

A photograph of little Ernst with his reel is not here: it is fort, not da.
It may be seen at this seminar, or on the flyer that I will send on request.
Anthony Stadlen

Fort!–Da!
1920–2020
A century of speculations on Freud’s report
on his grandson’s game in
Beyond the Pleasure Principle (1920)

Daniel Benveniste
conducts Inner Circle Seminar No. 262
introduced by Anthony Stadlen
Sunday 14 June 2020
10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

In September 1915 Sigmund Freud watched his 18-month-old grandson Ernst Wolfgang Halberstadt repeatedly and ‘very skilfully’ throw a wooden reel on a string into his cot with a cry ‘o-o-o-o’, which Freud thought meant ‘fort’ (gone’), and then make it reappear with a joyful da’ (there’). This became the paradigm case for a century of far-reaching speculations, including those of Freud himself on the ‘death instinct’ in Beyond the Pleasure Principle (1920), of R. D. Laing in The Divided Self (1960), and of Jacques Derrida in The Post Card (1980), as well as of Melanie Klein, Donald Winnicott and Jacques Lacan. Ernst became eventually W. Ernest Freud, the only grandchild of Freud to become a psychoanalyst, and the only other psychoanalyst to practise using Sigmund Freud’s legendary couch. 

But is it really possible to derive such consequences from a grandfathers report of his little grandsons game a hundred years ago? W. Ernest Freud told Anthony Stadlen that he could not even remember playing the game. How could any of the interpretations over the last hundred years be tested?

Today, Daniel Benvenisteclinical psychologist and Honorary Member of the American Psychoanalytical Association, discusses these questions in the light of his comprehensive research, including extensive interviews with W. Ernest Freud himself, as reported in his masterly biography, The Interwoven Lives of Sigmund, Anna and W. Ernest Freud: Three Generations of Psychoanalysts (2015). 


________________________________

Daniel Benveniste wrote for the centenary of little Ernsts actual playing of the game in September 1915:

September 13, 2015
Bellevue, Washington

To all those who are interested in Fort Da,

On September 13, 1915, Sigmund Freud, along with his sister-in-law, Minna Bernays, traveled north via Munich and Berlin to visit his daughter Sophie, son-in-law Max, and his little grandson Ernst in Hamburg (E. Jones, 1955, p. 181). During this two-week visit, Freud observed something that was destined to contribute to the reshaping of his theory. What he observed was something that went beyond the primary motivation of pleasure and therefore the pleasure principle. It was something that had implications for the compulsion to repeat, the turning of passive into active, the management of loss, and the renunciation of instinctual gratification. He observed Ernst’s game of fort da and its related games of disappearance and return, which he would famously describe five years later in his book Beyond the Pleasure Principle (1920/1955).

There is perhaps no case, no dream, no observation of Freud’s that has received more commentaries and alternative interpretations than his observation of his eighteen-month-old grandson Ernst playing with a wooden reel on the end of a string. When his mother left the apartment, for whatever reason, Ernst would repeatedly throw this wooden reel, with a string tied to it, into a curtained cot while holding the other end of the string in his hand. In this way, the reel disappeared into the cot, and, as it did, he said “o-o-o-o, which Freud and Ernst’s mother, Sophie, understood to mean fort (gone). And when he pulled on the string and the reel reappeared, he said, “da (there).

That was all there was to it. While Freud reported some other games of disappearance and return that Ernst played, this particular game contained all the main components. Freud saw in this little game of disappearance and return the symbolic representation of the renunciation of instinctual satisfaction, for in this game Ernst found a way to allow his mother to leave without protesting. In managing the distress he experienced in his mother’s absences, he turned passive into active and symbolically took revenge on his mother for leaving him: “All right, then, go away! I don’t need you. I’m sending you away myself.” He symbolized his mother as the little wooden reel. Then, instead of being thrown away or abandoned, Ernst threw the reel away—threw his mother away—and then brought it back—brought her back, when he wanted. Freud also saw in this game a situation (abandonment) that was clearly not pleasant but was repeated over and over again, similar to many neurotic behaviors. From this observation, Freud gained insight into the nature of the repetition compulsion and behaviors motivated by something “beyond the pleasure principle.”

Parts of the game were first described in a footnote to the 1919 edition of The Interpretation of Dreams, and in 1920 a full description was presented and interpreted in a mere four pages in Beyond the Pleasure Principle. No one at that time could have imagined it would later stir the interests and alternative interpretations of Melanie Klein, Donald Winnicott, Erik Erikson, Siegfried Bernfeld, Harold P. Blum, Jacques Lacan, Jacques Derrida, Jean Piaget, and so many others. 

The fort da baby was Freud's first grandchild, Ernst Wolfgang Halberstadt, who later changed his name to W. Ernest Freud largely because of his closeness to the Freud side of his family. W. Ernest Freud (1914-2008) was the only Freud grandchild to become a psychoanalyst. His story can be found in the recently published book The Interwoven Lives of Sigmund, Anna and W. Ernest Freud: Three Generations of Psychoanalysis


This week we celebrate the centennial of Sigmund Freud's Fort Da observation and are reminded of his extraordinary genius. Sigmund Freud looked at things others had looked at many times before and saw things no one had ever seen before.

Feel free to forward this note to others you know that might be interested in Fort Da.

Saludos,
Daniel Benveniste


________________________________


Venue: Durrants Hotel, 26–32 George Street, Marylebone, London W1H 5BJ
Cost: Psychotherapy trainees £132, others £165, some bursaries; coffee, tea, Durrants rock, mineral water included; payable in advance; no refunds or transfers unless seminar cancelled
Apply to: Anthony Stadlen, ‘Oakleigh’, 2A Alexandra Avenue, London N22 7XE
Tel: +44 (0) 20 8888 6857   iPhone: +44 (0) 7809 433250
E-mail: stadlen@aol.com  or: stadlenanthony@gmail.com
For further information on seminars, visit: http://anthonystadlen.blogspot.com/

The Inner Circle Seminars were founded by Anthony Stadlen in 1996 as an ethical, existential, phenomenological search for truth in psychotherapy. They have been kindly described by Thomas Szasz as ‘Institute for Advanced Studies in the Moral Foundations of Human Decency and Helpfulness’. But they are independent of all institutes, schools and colleges.

Thomas Szasz Centenary: Was Szasz a ‘Cartesian Dualist’? Anthony Stadlen conducts Inner Circle Seminar 258 (19 April 2020)


Thomas S. Szasz
(15 April 1920 – 8 September 2012)
Was Szasz a ‘Dualist?’
A centenary recapitulation and clarification

Anthony Stadlen
conducts Inner Circle Seminar No. 258
Sunday 19 April 2020
10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Thomas Szasz
at his 90th-birthday Inner Circle Seminar
Sunday 13 June 2010
Just about everybody, and certainly most so-called existential therapists and Daseinsanalysts if they had heard of him, deplored what Thomas Szasz said. Never mind that he usually didn’t say it. One of the most deplorable things about Szasz was said to be his lack of compassion for those suffering from ‘mental illness’. This was said to be a consequence of his deplorable ‘Cartesian dualism’. Did Szasz lack compassion? Was he a ‘Cartesian dualist’? In honour of Szasz’s centenary, Anthony Stadlen, close friend and colleague of Thomas Szasz, demystifies the muddle.

Venue: Durrants Hotel, 26–32 George Street, Marylebone, London W1H 5BJ
Subscription: Psychotherapy trainees £132, others £165, some bursaries; coffee, tea, Durrants Rock, mineral water included; payable in advance; no refunds or transfers unless seminar cancelled
Apply to: Anthony Stadlen, ‘Oakleigh’, 2A Alexandra Avenue, London N22 7XE
Tel: +44 (0) 20 8888 6857  iPhone: 07809 433 250
E-mail: stadlen@aol.com  or: stadlenanthony@gmail.com
For further information on seminars, visit: http://anthonystadlen.blogspot.com/

The Inner Circle Seminars were founded by Anthony Stadlen in 1996 as an ethical, existential, phenomenological search for truth in psychotherapy. They have been kindly described by Thomas Szasz as ‘Institute for Advanced Studies in the Moral Foundations of Human Decency and Helpfulness’. But they are independent of all institutes, schools and universities.

Mutual Analysis: Sándor Ferenczi, Elizabeth Severn, and the Origins of Trauma Theory . Peter Rudnytsky conducts Inner Circle Seminar 257 (1 March 2020)

Mutual Analysis
Sándor Ferenczi, Elizabeth Severn,
and the Origins of Trauma Theory

Peter Rudnytsky
conducts
Inner Circle Seminar No. 257
introduced by
Anthony Stadlen
Sunday 1 March 2020
10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Sándor Ferenczi
Elizabeth Severn

Sándor Ferenczi’s experiment in mutual analysis with Elizabeth Severn has hitherto been known from Ferenczi’s Clinical Diary, where Severn appears as R.N. But in his new edition of Severn’s 1933 book, The Discovery of the Self, Professor Peter Rudnytsky has shown that Severn gives us the other side of the story by providing disguised case histories both of herself and of Ferenczi. In todays seminar, Rudnytsky will lead us in a consideration of how Ferenczi and the woman whom Freud called his evil genius together revolutionised psychoanalysis by reviving trauma theory, modifying technique, and formulating a theory of the mind based on dissociation rather than repression.

Venue: Durrants Hotel, 26–32 George Street, Marylebone, London W1H 5BJ
Cost: Psychotherapy trainees £132, others £165, some bursaries; coffee, tea, Durrants rock, mineral water included; payable in advance; no refunds or transfers unless seminar cancelled
Apply to: Anthony Stadlen, ‘Oakleigh’, 2A Alexandra Avenue, London N22 7XE
Tel: +44 (0) 20 8888 6857   iPhone: +44 (0) 7809 433250
E-mail: stadlen@aol.com  or: stadlenanthony@gmail.com
For further information on seminars, visit: http://anthonystadlen.blogspot.com/

The Inner Circle Seminars were founded by Anthony Stadlen in 1996 as an ethical, existential, phenomenological search for truth in psychotherapy. They have been kindly described by Thomas Szasz as ‘Institute for Advanced Studies in the Moral Foundations of Human Decency and Helpfulness’. But they are independent of all institutes, schools and universities.

Heidegger’s ‘Worlds’: Anthony Stadlen conducts Inner Circle Seminar 256 (2 February 2020)

Heidegger‘Worlds

Early Lectures (Freiburg 1919-20)
A 100th-anniversary revaluation
The self-world and other worlds
Why did Heidegger give up his three-worlds theory?

Zollikon Seminars (1959-1969)
A 60th-anniversary revaluation
2. Second seminar. 3 February 1960
Being-with ... not tea with sugar ...
The non-phenomenologically applied thematic of intersubjectivity

Anthony Stadlen
conducts
Inner Circle Seminar No. 256
Sunday 2 February 2020
10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Martin Heidegger, at home, Freiburg
Martin Heidegger and Medard Boss
Feldweg, Messkirch, 1963

Ludwig Binswanger in the 1940s, e.g. in ‘The Case of Ellen West’, described many idiosyncratic ‘worlds’ of his patients, but also a relatively constant triad of ‘worlds’: ‘Umwelt’ (‘around-world’), ‘Mitwelt’ (‘with-world’), ‘Eigenwelt’ (‘own world’). Half a century on, Emmy van Deurzen added a fourth: the ‘Überwelt’ (‘over-world’). These four ‘worlds’ have been taught as part of so-called ‘existential therapy’ for thirty years. But Martin Heidegger had already, in his 1919-20 lectures a hundred years ago, proposed a triad like Binswanger’s, though with ‘Selbstwelt’ (‘self-world’) rather than ‘Eigenwelt only to denounce it a few years later as misconceived. An ‘Überwelt’ would, of course, have been even more alien to his thinking. In Being and Time (1927) he wrote: ‘The world of Dasein is Mitwelt.’

In the second Zollikon seminar, on 3 February 1960, Heidegger continued to explore our Mitwelt, our being-in-the-world-with-others. It is not, he insisted, like ‘tea with sugar’: not the ‘intersubjectivity’ that ‘existential therapists’ like to talk about.

Heidegger’s clear thinking demystifies what ‘existential’ teachers teach today.

Venue: Durrants Hotel, 26–32 George Street, Marylebone, London W1H 5BJ
Cost: Psychotherapy trainees £132, others £165, some bursaries; coffee, tea, Durrants rock, mineral water included; payable in advance; no refunds or transfers unless seminar cancelled
Apply to: Anthony Stadlen, ‘Oakleigh’, 2A Alexandra Avenue, London N22 7XE
Tel: +44 (0) 20 8888 6857   iPhone: +44 (0) 7809 433250
E-mail: stadlen@aol.com  or: stadlenanthony@gmail.com
For further information on seminars, visit: http://anthonystadlen.blogspot.com/

The Inner Circle Seminars were founded by Anthony Stadlen in 1996 as an ethical, existential, phenomenological search for truth in psychotherapy. They have been kindly described by Thomas Szasz as ‘Institute for Advanced Studies in the Moral Foundations of Human Decency and Helpfulness’. But they are independent of all institutes, schools and universities.

Echoism. Donna Christina Savery conducts Inner Circle Seminar 255 (19 January 2020)

Echoism
The Silenced Response to Narcissism
Practice and Theory

Donna Christina Savery
conducts
Inner Circle Seminar No. 255
introduced by
Anthony Stadlen
Sunday 19 January 2020
10 a.m. to 5 p.m.


Donna Christina Savery

In this seminar Donna Christina Savery introduces her research into echoism. Following seven years work with patients who have experienced narcissistic parenting or who find themselves in repeated relationships with narcissistic partners, she offers a new insight into narcissistic and co-dependent relationships.

Returning to the myth of Echo and Narcissus in Ovid, from which the vast array of psychoanalytic literature on narcissism originates, she asks how and why Echo’s voice and story have become marginalised to the extent that she is simply called a co-dependent (reinforcing the very notion of dependency upon a narcissist). She explains how she has drawn upon psychoanalytic literature, existential philosophy and a daseinsanalytic approach to practice as a way of understanding this largely forgotten group of individuals. She has worked with individuals, couples and groups and presents in her book Echoism, published in 2018, the first complete theory of echoism.


Venue: Durrants Hotel, 26–32 George Street, Marylebone, London W1H 5BJ
Cost: Psychotherapy trainees £132, others £165, some bursaries; coffee, tea, Durrants rock, mineral water included; payable in advance; no refunds or transfers unless seminar cancelled
Apply to: Anthony Stadlen, ‘Oakleigh’, 2A Alexandra AvenueLondon N22 7XE
Tel: +44 (0) 20 8888 6857   iPhone: +44 (0) 7809 433250
E-mail: stadlen@aol.com  or: stadlenanthony@gmail.com
For further information on seminars, visit: http://anthonystadlen.blogspot.com/

The Inner Circle Seminars were founded by Anthony Stadlen in 1996 as an ethical, existential, phenomenological search for truth in psychotherapy. They have been kindly described by Thomas Szasz as ‘Institute for Advanced Studies in the Moral Foundations of Human Decency and Helpfulness’. But they are independent of all institutes, schools, and universities.

Quodlibet Heideggeriensis. Richard Rojcewicz & Anthony Stadlen conduct Inner Circle Seminar No. 254 (1 December 2020)


Quodlibet Heideggeriensis
Selected issues from Heidegger’s Being and Time and his later ‘history of Being’ – and their implications for psychotherapy
                  
Richard Rojcewicz   Anthony Stadlen
conduct
Inner Circle Seminar No. 254
Sunday 1 December 2019
10 a.m. to 5 p.m.


Martin Heidegger at his hut

Richard Rojcewicz

Those who were fortunate enough to participate in Inner Circle Seminar No. 206 on 19 October 2014 recall the sensitivity with which Professor Richard Rojcewicz guided them through Martin Heideggers fundamental essay Die Frage nach der Technik’ [‘The Question Concerning Technology’] (1954), drawing on his revelatory translation and on his book The Gods and Technology: A Reading of Heidegger (2006), a high point in the secondary literature. He has translated many of Heidegger’s works including 2-15 of the Black Notebooks, as well as works of Husserl and Merleau-Ponty.

In todays Inner Circle Seminar No. 254, Professor Rojcewicz will be happy to answer questions on Heideggers Black Notebooks, and in particular on their alleged antisemitism. He will also, in dialogue with Anthony Stadlen and the other seminar participants, explore a number of enigmatic topics arising from Heidegger’s enormous oeuvre. Such topics will include: anxiety and its relation to the structure of world and to conscience (drawing on a case in Merleau-Ponty); the mysterious ‘voice of the friend that Dasein carries with it’ in Being and Time; ontology and ethics; the relation between Being, beings, God, and the gods in Heidegger’s early and late thinking. We shall try also to relate these topics to the practice of psychotherapy. You may wish to add topics; there may not be time for all our topics; but your contribution will be warmly welcomed.

Venue: Durrants Hotel, 26–32 George Street, Marylebone, London W1H 5BJ
Cost: Psychotherapy trainees £132, others £165, some bursaries; coffee, tea, Durrants Rock, mineral water included; payable in advance; no refunds or transfers unless seminar cancelled
Apply to: Anthony Stadlen, ‘Oakleigh’, 2A Alexandra Avenue, London N22 7XE
Tel: +44 (0) 20 8888 6857   iPhone: +44 (0) 7809 433250
E-mail: stadlen@aol.com  or: stadlenanthony@gmail.com
For further information on seminars, visit: http://anthonystadlen.blogspot.com/

The Inner Circle Seminars were founded by Anthony Stadlen in 1996 as an ethical, existential, phenomenological search for truth in psychotherapy. They have been kindly described by Thomas Szasz as ‘Institute for Advanced Studies in the Moral Foundations of Human Decency and Helpfulness’. But they are independent of all institutes, schools and universities.

Dream and Dasein. 3. Descartes, Freud, Heidegger/Boss on dreams. Katherine Morris & Anthony Stadlen conduct Inner Circle Seminar 253 (10 November 2019)

Dream and Da-sein 3
400th, 120th, 60th anniversaries
Descartes’s Dreams (10 November 1619)
Freuds Interpretation of Dreams (4 November 1899)
Heidegger’s First Zollikon Seminar (4 November 1959)

Katherine Morris   Anthony Stadlen

conduct
Inner Circle Seminar No. 253
Sunday 10 November 2019
10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
René Descartes 
Sigmund Freud
Martin Heidegger



Katherine Morris
Katherine Morris

In this seminar Katherine Morris, the distinguished Oxford philosopher and co-author of the book Descartes' Dualism (1996), joins Anthony Stadlen in inviting you to collaborate in a meditation on the meaning of the dream for human beings, in life and in psychotherapy.

Clients often report dreams to psychotherapists, with an implicit, and usually unexamined, request or demand that the therapist should interpret them. Should the therapist simply accede to such a request, or invite the client to reflect on the request itself?

And in those instances where client and therapist do agree to embark on a conjoint exploration of the possible meaning of the dream, what are the criteria, if any, for knowing whether such an interpretation is correct, or in some sense valid?

The seminar marks the auspicious conjunction of three anniversaries, associated with some of the greatest thinkers on the meaning of dreams: René Descartes, Sigmund Freud, Martin Heidegger, Medard Boss.

Descartes regarded his own dreams dreamt exactly 400 years ago on 10 November 1619 as a radical upheaval and revelation, leading to his epochmaking philosophy, and determining the whole course of his life and thinking.

Freud wrote of his own Interpretation of Dreams, published 120 years ago on 4 November 1899:

    ‘Insight such as this falls to ones lot but once in a lifetime.

Heidegger and Boss followed Freud in regarding the dream as in some sense paradigmatic for the understanding of the human being, but - as they expounded in the Zollikon Seminars, starting exactly 60 years later, 60 years ago, on 4 November 1969 - their daseinsanalytic approach differed in crucial respects from Freuds, whose thinking they thought had been distorted by his implicit but unrecognised dependence on Descartes. As Boss wrote in a momentous sentence:

    ‘What if there are no dream symbols at all?

Very few existential therapists know Heidegger’s writing on dreams. Bosss books on dreams are out of print; and second-hand copies are rare and expensive. Even most of those few existential therapists who have even heard of Bosss thinking on dreams, and even most of those many fewer who have read something of Bosss writing on dreams, have misunderstood it. A respected senior academic existential therapist at the 2018 conference of the Society for Existential Analysis gave a lecture which purported to expound and compare Freuds and Bosss respective positions on dream interpretation but stated them exactly the wrong way round. It was Freud, not Boss, who wrote that, if we do not understand what someone says, we ask him what he means; and that we should ask the dreamer, likewise, what his or her dream means. And it is Boss and his successor Gion Condrau in whose training institute for Daseinsanalysts in Zurich the examination candidate had to write the meaning of a given written dream of a dreamer about whom only the age and sex are divulged. Condrau wrote in Existential Analysis 5 (1994: 46):

If we did, indeed, base our thinking on the idea that the dreamer decides on the meaning of his/her dream, this would open the doors wide to a subjectivistic phenomenology. Isn’t it precisely the essence of neurotic (or psychotic) perception, namely not to be able to distinguish phenomena from personal prejudices or projections?

This may not be what existential therapists fondly imagine to be the dream philosophy of the institute which Martin Heidegger helped found; but it is so.

How may we decide whether any of the differing dream theories of these thinkers can yield a correct or valid interpretation?

First, we must be clear what they actually wrote, as opposed to the nonsense that is written and spoken about what they are supposed to have written.

In todays seminar Anthony Stadlen will clarify what FreudHeidegger, and Boss actually wrote on dreams. 

And Katherine Morris, world expert on Descartes, has already conducted a revelatory Inner Circle Seminar (https://anthonystadlen.blogspot.com/2016/01/descartes-and-dualism-katherine-morris.htmlin which she showed that Descartess dualism was not the crude Cartesian dualism generally attributed to him. Today she will help us root our discussions of Descartes in what he actually wrote, rather than in what he is supposed to have written.

Only then shall we begin to explore how a therapist might reasonably respond when a client reports a dream.

Your own contribution to the discussion will be most welcome.


Venue:  ‘Oakleigh’, 2A Alexandra AvenueLondon N22 7XE
Cost: Psychotherapy trainees £132, others £165, some bursaries; coffee, tea, biscuits, berries, nuts, mineral water included; payable in advance; no refunds or transfers unless seminar cancelled

Special offer to those who have booked for the Society for Existential Analysis Conference on Saturday 9 November 2019: Psychotherapy trainees £50, others £60

Apply to: Anthony Stadlen, ‘Oakleigh’, 2A Alexandra Avenue, London N22 7XE
Tel: +44 (0) 20 8888 6857   iPhone: +44 (0) 7809 433250
E-mail: stadlen@aol.com  or: stadlenanthony@gmail.com
For further information on seminars, visit: http://anthonystadlen.blogspot.com/

The Inner Circle Seminars were founded by Anthony Stadlen in 1996 as an ethical, existential, phenomenological search for truth in psychotherapy. They have been kindly described by Thomas Szasz as ‘Institute for Advanced Studies in the Moral Foundations of Human Decency and Helpfulness. But they are independent of all institutes, schools and universities.