Sunday, 1 January 2017

Being-in-the-World: My Body and I. Raymond Tallis conducts Inner Circle Seminar 247 (15 July 2018)

Being-in-the-World
My Body and I

Raymond Tallis
conducts Inner Circle Seminar No. 247
introduced by Anthony Stadlen
Sunday 15 July 2018
10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Raymond Tallis

Raymond Tallis is one of our best-loved invited speakers. Today he conducts his fifth Inner Circle Seminar (his first was on 2 December 2012).

He has shown in four profound Inner Circle Seminars that he is one of the world’s leading demystifiers of what he calls the ‘neuroscience delusion’ (‘neuromania’) and the ‘intellectual plague of biologism’ (‘animalism’). His ruthless, good-humoured exposure of reductive natural-scientism continues the tradition of Heidegger and  Szasz, but is utterly his own. Psychotherapists are free to choose to go on making fools of themselves by pretending to be ‘validated’ by ‘neuroscience’; but their work, such as it is, speaks for itself, and no pseudo-scientific ‘validation’ can disguise this.
Raymond Tallis 

Raymond Tallis writes about todays seminar:

That we are organisms cannot be denied: we are generated by processes common to other living creatures and die of similar causes. Between our biological beginning and our biological end, however, we live lives that are distant from the organic processes that sustain them. The seminar will explore our nature as embodied beings-in-the-world, inseparable from, and yet not identical with, our bodies, and the tension between the I am of the person and the it is of the organism.’

For an account of how Raymond Tallis writes his extraordinary books, see his article ‘My writing day: In my favourite pub, the staff turn down the speaker in my writing corner’, in The Guardian Review of 29 April 2017:
https://www.theguardian.com/books/2017/apr/29/my-writing-day-raymond-tallis

Raymond Tallis was a Professor of Geriatric Medicine and consultant physician in Health Care of the Elderly. He has published two hundred research articles in the neurology of old age and neurological rehabilitation, as well as a novel, short stories, three volumes of poetry, and thirty books on philosophy of mind, philosophical anthropology, literary theory, the nature of art, and cultural criticism. He has received many awards and honorary degrees. In 2009, the Economist listed him as one of the world’s twenty leading polymaths.

Nicholas Fearn wrote in The Independent:

When Kirsty Young was asked to name her favourite guest on Desert Island Discs, the rock star Paul Weller was beaten into second place, for her own luxury item would be the writer Raymond Tallis.

Raymond Tallis, whose fifth Inner Circle Seminar this will be, kindly confirms that our seminar structure, in which dialogue is of the essence, enables him to communicate and reflect on his ideas. He wrote, after his first Inner Circle Seminar, The Intellectual Plague of Biologism, on 2 December 2012:

The seminar was for me an incredible experience. I have never previously had the opportunity to discuss the topics we covered in such depth with a group of people who came at it from such different angles but in a way that I found illuminating. I learned a lot. It was a tremendous privilege.

Venue: Durrants Hotel, 26–32 George Street, Marylebone, London W1H 5BJ
Cost: Psychotherapy trainees £132, others £165, some bursaries; coffee, tea, Durrants rock, mineral water included; payable in advance; no refunds or transfers unless seminar cancelled
Apply to: Anthony Stadlen, ‘Oakleigh’, 2A Alexandra Avenue, London N22 7XE
Tel: +44 (0) 20 8888 6857     E-mail: stadlen@aol.com
For further information on seminars, visit: http://anthonystadlen.blogspot.com/

The Inner Circle Seminars were founded by Anthony Stadlen in 1996 as an ethical, existential, phenomenological search for truth in psychotherapy. They have been kindly described by Thomas Szasz as ‘Institute for Advanced Studies in the Moral Foundations of Human Decency and Helpfulness’. But they are independent of all institutes, schools and universities.

Locked Up: ‘Patients’ and their Gaolers 15. Janet Frame (1924–2004). Susannah Wilson conducts Inner Circle Seminar 246 (17 June 2018)

Locked Up: ‘Patients’ and their Gaolers
15. Janet Frame
(1924–2004)

Susannah Wilson

conducts
Inner Circle Seminar No. 246
introduced by
Anthony Stadlen
Sunday 17 June 2018
10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
                  
Janet Frame
Susannah Wilson
Janet Frame (28 August 1924 29 January 2004) was a leading, active and prolific, New Zealand writer of fiction and poetry. Her extraordinary 1980s three-volume autobiography, To the Is-land, An Angel at my Table and The Envoy from Mirror City, describes in painful detail several periods of psychiatric treatment from her early twenties onwards. After attempting suicide, she was incarcerated for eight years in New Zealand hospitals, diagnosed with ‘schizophrenia’ and ‘treated’ frequently with electric shock and insulin therapy. In 1951 a scheduled lobotomy was cancelled when her doctors realised she had won a prestigious award. She describes positively her time at the London Maudsley hospital, where she was pronounced not ‘schizophrenic’; but she evokes the helplessness and impotence of voluntary asylum patients, and the dependency at the heart of the doctor-patient power relationship.

Susannah Wilson, Associate Professor in French Studies at the University of Warwick, former British Academy Postdoctoral Research Fellow and recipient of a British Academy Rising Star Engagement Award, has already conducted enthralling seminars on Camille Claudel and Hersilie Rouy in our Locked Up series.

Venue:   Durrants Hotel, 26–32 George Street, Marylebone, London W1H 5BJ
Cost:    Psychotherapy trainees £132, others £165, some bursaries; coffee, tea, mineral water, Durrants Rock included; payable in advance; no refunds or transfers unless seminar cancelled
Apply to: Anthony Stadlen, ‘Oakleigh’, 2A Alexandra Avenue, London N22 7XE
Tel: +44 (0) 20 8888 6857     E-mail: stadlen@aol.com
For further information on seminars, visit: http://anthonystadlen.blogspot.com/

The Inner Circle Seminars were founded by Anthony Stadlen in 1996 as an ethical, existential, phenomenological search for truth in psychotherapy. They have been kindly described by Thomas Szasz as ‘Institute for Advanced Studies in the Moral Foundations of Human Decency and Helpfulness’. But they are independent of all institutes, schools and universities.

Laing & Esterson. 10. The Kings. 50 years on. Hilary Mantel and Anthony Stadlen conduct Inner Circle Seminar 242 (11 February 2018)

Laing and Esterson
Sanity, Madness and the Family
50 Years On
Family 10: The Kings

Dame Hilary Mantel   Anthony Stadlen
conduct
Inner Circle Seminar No. 242
Sunday 11 February 2018
10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Hilary Mantel
Aaron Esterson
R. D. Laing


This utterly straightforward book is still not understood today, especially by ‘professionals’. But Hilary Mantel, who gained courage to become a novelist through reading it when she was nearly twenty-one, understood it. She urged readers: ‘Just read the simple words the people speak.’ In this seminar you will have a unique opportunity actually to hear and discuss with Hilary Mantel herself ‘the simple words the people speak’, from the tape-recordings that Esterson made of his conversations with Hazel King’ and the King family in the early 1960s and that Anthony Stadlen made of his  conversations with ‘Hazel and other surviving members of the family half a century later.

In her first Reith lecture Hilary Mantel discusses the relation between the historical novelist and the historian.


She brings to our seminars the unique genius of an historical novelist who sees far more profoundly than the rest of us the implications of the known historical facts but does not present invention as history. Each of our seminars begins with her wonderful reflections on what is given in the text of the book. She has no privileged access to the case. She learns what I have discovered as an historian only as do the other seminar participants, when I play recordings of my interviews with the surviving members of the family half a century later and explore Estersons original library of tape-recordings on which the book is based.

Nine of the original eleven women diagnosed schizophrenic are now dead; but Mantel recalls Auden:

... the crack in the teacup opens
A lane to the land of the dead.

She could have also have quoted Eliot:

And what the dead had no speech for, when living,
They can tell you, being dead: the communication
Of the dead is tongued with fire beyond the language of the living.

In this tenth of the eleven families, however, while her father and mother are dead, Hazel herself and a significant number of her relatives who know her are still alive and agreed to be interviewed.

Why is this nowadays rarely read or even referenced book of 1964 so important? It is, after all, absent from almost all discussions either of the family or of schizophreniaThe extremely rare discussions of it patronise it, as if they had long passed beyond it; but without having begun to understand it, let alone catch up with it.

And yet it is so simple.

It is true that R. D. Laing and Aaron Estersons research, reported in this masterpiece of 1964 and continued by Esterson in his profound The Leaves of Spring: A Study in the Dialectics of Madness (1970), was a concrete embodiment of the complex theoretical work of their most advanced and radical contemporaries of the 1960s: Jean-Paul SartreCritique of Dialectical Reason and The Question of MethodThomas SzaszThe Myth of Mental Illness; and Martin Heidegger and Medard BossZollikon Seminars.

Sartre highly esteemed Laing and Esterson’s work on families. Szasz had enormous respect for Esterson; he thought this book was on a higher level than Laing’s other books; he also thought Stadlens research following up the eleven families important. Heidegger would surely have loved the book, though it is unlikely he knew it; it embodies that straightforward openness and humanity he tried to convey in his Zollikon seminars, though he might well have asked: Why drag in Sartre? Professor Friedrich-Wilhelm von Herrmann of FreiburgHeidegger’s personal assistant whom he entrusted with editing posthumously his 102-volume Collected Works, and his wife Frau Dr. Veronika von Herrmann, particularly admire Laing and Esterson’s work. But almost all Daseinsanalysts, existential therapists, psychoanalysts, psychotherapists  and of course psychiatrists – ignore it.

But the book is essentially simple. What did Laing and Esterson say that was so simple: too simple for ‘professionals’ to understand?

We believe that the shift of point of view that these descriptions both embody and demand has an historical significance no less radical than the shift from a demonological to a clinical viewpoint three hundred years ago.

Thus they introduced their great phenomenological descriptions of eleven families of ‘schizophrenics’. But, more than fifty years on, the ‘clinical viewpoint’ still reigns supreme. ‘Existential’, ‘Lacanian’, ‘Laingian’, ‘humanist’, ‘person-centred’ therapists and a galaxy of similarly impressively titled psychoanalysts and psychotherapists love to call themselves ‘clinicians’.

The great and the good, including younger members of our royal family, seek ‘parity’ for ‘physical’ and ‘mental health’. This is well-intentioned but confusing. Indeed ‘it is good to talk’ – but not in this mystifying, pseudo-scientific language. 

Have Laing and Esterson been proved wrong? They wrote:

Nobody can deny us the right to disbelieve in schizophrenia.’

Why, then, do most psychiatrists and psychotherapists claim Laing and Esterson said ‘families cause schizophrenia’? They can not have understood, if they have ever remembered, if they have ever read, the first sentences of the second edition (1970) of the book:

There have been many studies of mental illness and the family. This book is not of them, at least in our opinion.’

Hilary Mantel wrote that ‘the simple words the people speak’ in Laing and Esterson’s book gave her, when twenty years old, the courage to write her own books, which have been internationally acclaimed. Her introductions to the seminars in this series have enthralled participants with their sensitive understanding of, and deeply perceptive insight into, each family in turn.

As she has written:

Some of us need a little push, before we recognise we have the right to pick up a pen. In my case it came from a book by the psychiatrists R. D. Laing and Aaron EstersonSanity, Madness and the Family... The people in it seemed close enough to touch... Each interview is a novel or play in miniature. So many of these family conversations seemed familiar to me: their swerves and evasions, their doubleness... For most of my life I had been told that I didn't know how the world worked. That afternoon I decided I did know, after all. In the course of my twenty-one years I'd noticed quite a lot. If I wanted to be a writer, I didn't have to worry about inventing material, I'd already got it. The next stage was just to find some words.

Hilary Mantelat least, had no difficulty understanding what Laing and Esterson were talking about:

All the patients profiled in the book are young women. I know their names are pseudonyms, but over the years I've wondered desperately what happened to them, and if there's anyone alive who knows, and whether any of them ever cut free from the choking knotweed of miscommunication and flourished on ground of their own: Ruth, who was thought odd because she wore coloured stockings; Jean, who wanted a baby though her whole family told her she didn't; and Sarah, whose breakdown, according to her family, was caused by too much thinking.

(http://www.theguardian.com/books/2008/sep/06/1)

Anthony Stadlen, through his historical research, is able to answer some of Hilary Mantels questions.

Laing and Esterson wrote:

Surely, if we are wrong, it would be easy to show that we are, by studying a few families and revealing that schizophrenics really are talking a lot of nonsense after all.

Anthony Stadlen accepted this challenge by studying the very same eleven families they had studied: listening to Esterson’s original tape recordings and interviewing living family members fifty years on. Today, by listening to Estersons 1960s recordings of Hazel King’ and her family and to Stadlens recordings of his 21st-century interviews with living family members including Hazel’ herself (one of only two still living of the original eleven so-called ‘schizophrenics), you can collaborate in evaluating whether Hazel’ was ‘really talking a lot of nonsense after all’.

This is the only chapter of the eleven that Stadlens research shows to be seriously inaccurate. It is also the only one where a family member asked whether Laing and Esterson had published their research; her recorded views on the chapter will be played.

Your contribution to the dialogue will be warmly welcomed.

Venue: Durrants Hotel, 26–32 George Street, Marylebone, London W1H 5BJ
Cost: Psychotherapy trainees £132, others £165, some bursaries; coffee, tea, mineral water, Durrants rock included; payable in advance; no refunds or transfers unless seminar cancelled
Apply to: Anthony Stadlen, ‘Oakleigh’, 2A Alexandra AvenueLondon N22 7XE
Tel: +44 (0) 20 8888 6857  +44 (0) 7809 433 250
E-mail: stadlen@aol.com
For further information on seminars, visit: http://anthonystadlen.blogspot.com/

The Inner Circle Seminars were founded by Anthony Stadlen in 1996 as an ethical, existential, phenomenological search for truth in psychotherapy. They have been kindly described by Thomas Szasz as ‘Institute for Advanced Studies in the Moral Foundations of Human Decency and Helpfulness’. But they are independent of all institutes, schools and universities.

Heidegger's Zollikon Seminars. 10. The Psychoanalytic Life History. Anthony Stadlen conducts Inner Circle Seminar 241 (21 January 2018)

Heidegger’s Zollikon Seminars
(1959-1969)
A 50th-anniversary revaluation
10. Heidegger and Boss discuss Freud (3)
(Taormina, April 1963)
‘... the psychoanalytic life history is not a history at all, rather a causal chain’

Anthony Stadlen
conducts Inner Circle Seminar No. 241
Sunday 21 January 2018
10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Martin Heidegger
at home, Freiburg
Martin Heidegger   Medard Boss
on the Feldweg south of Messkirch


                                                                                                                                                   
      







We are exploring the background discussions between the philosopher Martin Heidegger and the psychiatrist Medard Boss to Heidegger’s 1959-1969 seminars in Boss’s Zollikon home as reported in the book Zollikon Seminars. We have seen that, in their April 1963 conversations in Taormina, Sicily, Heidegger confirms Freud’s discoveries of transference, repression, etc. but as ecstatic-intentional world-relationship’, not as natural-scientistic metapsychology’. We shall ask, however, whether Heidegger’s breezy dismissal of the psychoanalytic life-history’ is based on adequate reading. Is there more phenomenology in psychoanalysis and more ‘calculative machination’ in Heidegger’s thinking than he acknowledges?

Venue: ‘Oakleigh’, 2A Alexandra Avenue, London N22 7XE
Cost: Psychotherapy trainees £132, others £165, some bursaries; coffee, tea, biscuits, berries, nuts, mineral water included; no refunds or transfers unless seminar cancelled
Apply to: Anthony Stadlen, ‘Oakleigh’, 2A Alexandra Avenue, London N22 7XE
Tel: +44 (0) 20 8888 6857     E-mail: stadlen@aol.com
For further information on seminars, visit: http://anthonystadlen.blogspot.com/

The Inner Circle Seminars were founded by Anthony Stadlen in 1996 as an ethical, existential, phenomenological search for truth in psychotherapy. They have been kindly described by Thomas Szasz as ‘Institute for Advanced Studies in the Moral Foundations of Human Decency and Helpfulness’. But they are independent of all institutes, schools and universities.

Heidegger Zollikon Seminars. 9. Baby Dasein – mother-baby Mitdasein. Tanja Staehler & Anthony Stadlen conduct Inner Circle Seminar 240 (10 December 2017)

Heidegger’s Zollikon Seminars
(1959-1969)
A 50th-anniversary revaluation
9. Heidegger and Boss discuss Freud (2)
(Taormina, April 1963)
Baby Dasein – mother-baby Mitdasein
Demystifying ‘Introjection
‘... [the child] is out there” still absorbed in the ways of being-in-the-world of its mother.’

Tanja Staehler  Anthony Stadlen
conduct
Inner Circle Seminar No. 240
Sunday 10 December 2017
10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Martin Heidegger with his son Jörg

Martin Heidegger
at home in Freiburg
Heidegger and Boss
on the Feldweg south of Messkirch, 1963
Tanja Staehler with her sons Luka and Nikolai

In this seminar we continue exploring Heidegger’s original, positive, and creative rethinking of Freud’s understanding of human beings and their relationships. Too many existential therapists practise shallow supportive counselling mystified with pretentious ‘existential’ jargon. They remain complacently ignorant of psychoanalysis and so fail to help their clients to learn from history and break the cycle of repeating it. Similarly, too many psychoanalysts are caught in a mechanistic ‘metapsychology’ that mystifies human freedom. Todays seminar points the way to transcending this schizoid split which dishonours our profession.

In April 1963 in TaorminaSicily, preparing the Zollikon seminars, Martin Heidegger showed Medard Boss how Daseinsanalysis could demythologise and purify psychoanalysis. He did not throw Freud’s phenomenological insights out with the ‘metapsychological’ bathwater, but understood them as ‘ecstatic world-relationship’ rather than as ‘psychic mechanism’. Today we explore Heidegger’s critique of the psychoanalytic concept of introjection introduced by Ferenczi and adopted by FreudAbraham, and Klein to conceptualise how a baby relates to its mother. The truth, says Heidegger, is the opposite: the child is out there” still absorbed in the ways of being-in-the-world of its mother. We also examine Heidegger’s discussion, in his 1928-9 lectures (Introduction to Philosophy) the year after he published Being and Time, of a new-born baby as already Da-sein, being-in-the-world. This ‘crying, wriggling moving into the world’ shows that the baby is not a ‘shut-in subject’ but ‘already out there with ...’. This is surely a simple but profound way of understanding and not doing violence to human reality. But does Heidegger do justice to the rich phenomenology of so-called 
‘unconscious’ bodily phantasy, for example of so-called introjection, as described by Freud, Ferenczi, Abraham, Klein, and subsequent psychoanalysts?

What is the history of our childhood with which each of us has to come to terms? It can be radically clarified and transformed, or further mystified and degraded, through psychotherapy. This is sometimes a matter of existential life or death, for our clients and for us.

Tanja Staehler
, Professor of European Philosophy at the University of Sussex, has written many papers relating Heidegger’s thinking to birth and mother-baby relationships.

Anthony Stadlen
 is the only UK Daseinsanalyst, an existential, psychoanalytic, and family psychotherapist; he is convenor of the Inner Circle Seminars.

Mothers with babies are especially welcome in the seminar to contribute to an evaluation of Heidegger’s account.

Venue: ‘Oakleigh’, 2A Alexandra Avenue, London N22 7XE
Cost: Mothers with babies £20, psychotherapy trainees £132, others £165, some bursaries; coffee, tea, mineral water, biscuits, berries, nuts included; payable in advance; no refunds or transfers unless seminar cancelled
Apply to: Anthony Stadlen, ‘Oakleigh’, 2A Alexandra Avenue, London N22 7XE
Tel: +44 (0) 20 8888 6857  E-mail: stadlen@aol.com
For further information on seminars, visit:


The Inner Circle Seminars were founded by Anthony Stadlen in 1996 as an ethical, existential, phenomenological search for truth in psychotherapy. They have been kindly described by Thomas Szasz as ‘Institute for Advanced Studies in the Moral Foundations of Human Decency and Helpfulness’. But they are independent of all institutes, schools and universities.

Discussion and performance of Tim Watts’s opera Kepler’s Trial at Victoria and Albert Museum (9 November 2017)

An Accused ‘Witch’ and her Inquisitors
Katharina Kepler (1546–1622)
Johannes Kepler’s Defence of his Mother
in her ‘Witch’ Trial
The Disharmony of the World

Ulinka Rublack, Tim Watts and a panel discuss
Tim Roberts's opera
Keplers Trial (2016)
before it is performed
at the Victoria and Albert Museum
Thursday 9 November 2017

Participants in the Inner Circle Seminars
are recommended to attend
(details and tickets from the V & A)

Johannes Kepler (15711630)
Ulinka Rublack
Tim Watts
Johannes Kepler (1571–1630) was the great astronomer whose Laws developed Copernicus’s thinking and were explained by Newton in his theory. When Kepler’s mother Katharina (1546–1622) was incarcerated and put on trial in Tübingen, accused of being a witch, he moved to live near her, and devoted himself to studying law so that he could defend her in court with the most convincing arguments he could muster. Against all odds, he won the case. Katharina was cleared of the charge of witchcraft. But she has continued to be misrepresented and maligned over the centuries. For instance, Paul Hindemith, in his own libretto for his 1957 opera about KeplerThe Harmony of the World, while ascribing to her a real clairvoyant gift, invents what seems an unhistorical split between mother and son in which she deplores his natural-scientific investigations as desecration and he rejects her alleged magical-mystical practices as superstition. (In fact, Kepler embodied a vision of the oneness of religion and nature, in which there was no such split.) Hindemith’s opera associates Katharina with the moon, and by implication with lunacy, even if at the end it assigns her supposed moonshine’ activities a legitimate place in the cosmos. And Arthur Koestler, in his book The Sleepwalkers: A history of mans changing vision of the Universe (1959), called Katharina an ‘old hag’, ‘a hideous little old woman, whose meddlesome and evil tongue, together with her suspect background, predestined her as a victim’.

The research of Ulinka Rublack, Professor of Early Modern European History at St Johns College in the University of Cambridge, has challenged this tradition of denigrating Katharina Kepler. Professor Rublack shows, in her book The Astronomer and the Witch: Johannes Keplers Fight for his Mother (2015), that Kepler brilliantly argued and demonstrated in the trial that his mothers behaviour needed no demonological explanation of the kind proposed by her inquisitors; on the contrary, her conduct was socially intelligible in ordinary human terms, as the understandable conduct of an older widowed woman in her social situation. In this way of seeing and presenting the phenomena, Kepler anticipated Laing and Esterson’s twentieth-century work with women diagnosed as schizophrenicreported in Sanity, Madness and the Family (1964), which we have been studying in the Inner Circle Seminars.

The composer Tim Watts’s new opera Keplers Trial (2016) (http://keplers-trial.com/) was written at Ulinka Rublacks instigation and with her collaboration as a response to Hindemiths unhistorical treatment of Katharina in his opera.

On the evening of Thursday 9 November, Ulinka Rublack, Tim Watts, and a distinguished panel will introduce a performance of the opera Keplers Trial at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London. Participants in the Inner Circle Seminars are recommended to attend. (See http://keplers-trial.com/.)  

Is this merely an historically fascinating episode? Or is the inquisitorial method of the witch’ trials four hundred years ago still alive, as Szasz, Laing and Esterson insisted, in the methods of diagnosis and treatment prevalent in our present-day clinical psychiatry – and its handmaiden, institutionalised and falsely medicalised psychotherapy? And is the continuing disparagement of Katharina Kepler a paradigm of that continuing hegemony of the calculative machination’ of natural-scientism that Heidegger documented and deplored? The concerns of our seminars are unified in this enthralling opera.

Professor Ulinka Rublack was born and raised in Germany, but has taught at Cambridge for nearly twenty years. Her research interests focus on sixteenth and seventeenth century culture, its visual and material aspects, the European Reformation, gender and society as well as methodological concerns.

She is editor of the Oxford Concise Companion to History. Her previous monographs include Dressing Up: Cultural Identity in Early Modern Europe, also published by Oxford University Press, which explores the relation between dress and identities in the period, won the Bainton Prize and was one of six books nominated for the Cundill Prize, the largest non-fiction history book prize in the world.

Ulinka Rublack is sole founder of the Cambridge History for Schools outreach programme; she is a co-founder of what became the Cambridge Centre for Gender Studies and has served on its working party for over ten years. She has been a full member of three European research networks and most recently served as a member of the steering committee of the AHRC-funded network on the history of luxury, led by Giorgio Riello. She has been visiting scholar at the Maison de lHomme, Paris, and her books have been translated into German and Chinese. One of her aims is to explore and interpret the past in novel ways by collaborating with other scholars as well as with artists and makers. She has co-curated the Fitzwilliam exhibition Treasured Possessions and curated its exhibition A Young Man's Progress (March - September 2015), which resulted from her collaboration with an artist and fashion designer in response to Renaissance fashion images. Further information is available on her tumblr The First Book of Fashion.

Professor Rublack has been awarded grants to collaborate with composer Tim Watts and video artist Aura Satz to create art work which responds to the story of Johannes Kepler and his mother; this resulted in Wattss acclaimed opera Keplers Trial (http://keplers-trial.com/). She is also co-investigator of a Swiss National Foundation grant to explore the relationship of materiality, objects and emotional communities in the early modern world. She has recently been appointed as Gender Equality Champion for the University. She combines her busy career with raising two children.

Tim Watts combines careers as composer, pianist and teacher, and lives in Downham Market, Norfolk.

His music has been performed across the UK in venues including Wigmore Hall, the Purcell Room, the King’s Head Theatre and Ely Cathedral, as well as internationally in Canada, Hong Kong and Singapore.

Recently commissions have included works for St John's College, Cambridge, The Fairey Band, Southbank Sinfonia, Britten Sinfonia, Laura van der Heijden and the European Union Chamber Orchestra, Contemporary Consort, the Benyounes Quartet, song cycles for Andrew Kennedy and Cerys Jones and harpsichord solos (with and without electronics) for Jane Chapman, one of which was joint winner of the Horniman Museum Composition Competition.

He was the featured composer at the 2013 King’s Lynn Festival and has enjoyed residencies at Bedford School and Uppingham School, both of which have inspired numerous works for young performers.

Tim Watts studied composition with Jeffery Wilson, Hugh Wood and Robin Holloway. He is a Fellow of St John’s College, Cambridge and also teaches at the Faculty of Music in Cambridge and at the Royal College of Music.